Latest Tweets:

unconsumption:

worldcafe:

Ever wonder what to do with old CDs?  A town in Bulgaria made them into public art.  More pictures and the story on Slate.

Upcycling used/unwanted/outdated CDs (6,000, in this case!) into works of art always is an interesting reuse. More examples of that, plus other new uses for CDs, in earlier Unconsumption posts here

*62
fastcompany:

A new report ranks the world’s countries not on their economic indicators, but on their ability to “safeguard the needs of its future generations.” The results might surprise you… Here are the 59 countries that are most prepared to handle an uncertain future…

fastcompany:

A new report ranks the world’s countries not on their economic indicators, but on their ability to “safeguard the needs of its future generations.” The results might surprise you… Here are the 59 countries that are most prepared to handle an uncertain future

"Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail."

Ralph Waldo Emerson (via wellsaidblog)

(via goodideaexchange)

theatlantic:

Should Governments Care About Happiness?

When a Guardian journalist visited Bhutan recently, the country’s “mystical” quotient did not disappoint. Among other things, the writer noted “men and women laboring in song,” a woman “scampering around churning a pot of yak butter tea,” and the “sound of mule bells ringing in the valley.” As he reaches the remote mountain home of a local herder, the man quips, as though starring in a tourism commercial, “You know, happiness is a place.” 
Indeed, it’s a rare Bhutan story that doesn’t mention how irrepressibly joyous the country is.
In place of speed-limit signs, another Guardian piece notes that drivers in Bhutan are met with placards reading, “Life is a journey! Complete it!” or “Let nature be your guide.”
The recently released 2013 UN World Happiness Report devotes a sizable section to Bhutan, attempting to quantify the happiness levels of the only country that prioritizes contentment over income.
The country’s 1729 legal code stated that, “if the Government cannot create happiness for its people, there is no purpose for the Government to exist.” In 1972, this sentiment was codified when Bhutan’s King, Jigme Singye Wangchuck, instituted a “Gross National Happiness” as its official measure of progress, superseding the more traditional Gross National Product in importance. The country’s constitution directs the state “to promote those conditions that will enable the pursuit of Gross National Happiness.”
Read more. [Image: Andrees Latif/Reuters]

theatlantic:

Should Governments Care About Happiness?

When a Guardian journalist visited Bhutan recently, the country’s “mystical” quotient did not disappoint. Among other things, the writer noted “men and women laboring in song,” a woman “scampering around churning a pot of yak butter tea,” and the “sound of mule bells ringing in the valley.” As he reaches the remote mountain home of a local herder, the man quips, as though starring in a tourism commercial, “You know, happiness is a place.” 

Indeed, it’s a rare Bhutan story that doesn’t mention how irrepressibly joyous the country is.

In place of speed-limit signs, another Guardian piece notes that drivers in Bhutan are met with placards reading, “Life is a journey! Complete it!” or “Let nature be your guide.”

The recently released 2013 UN World Happiness Report devotes a sizable section to Bhutan, attempting to quantify the happiness levels of the only country that prioritizes contentment over income.

The country’s 1729 legal code stated that, “if the Government cannot create happiness for its people, there is no purpose for the Government to exist.” In 1972, this sentiment was codified when Bhutan’s King, Jigme Singye Wangchuck, instituted a “Gross National Happiness” as its official measure of progress, superseding the more traditional Gross National Product in importance. The country’s constitution directs the state “to promote those conditions that will enable the pursuit of Gross National Happiness.”

Read more. [Image: Andrees Latif/Reuters]

*59

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace"

Jimi Hendrix (via bijan)

"It’s like Edison said: If you want to have a great idea, have a lot of them. Or like Macklemore puts it, the greats weren’t great because at birth they could paint, they were great because they painted a lot. Or as Lui, the Medium writer, paraphrases This American Life host Ira Glass, “the best way to refine your craft is to create a huge volume of work. Not to create the most perfect piece you can, but to create many pieces of work.”"

Want To Conquer A New Skill? Do It Every Day | Fast Company | Business Innovation (via infoneer-pulse)

(via infoneer-pulse)

*19
emergentfutures:

New Kind Of Ikea Hack: Flat-Packs Head To Refugee Camps

Packaged inside iconic Ikea flat-packs come all the parts needed to put together a refugee housing unit, the result of more than two years of research by the Ikea Foundation, the Swedish retailer’s philanthropic arm, in partnership with UNHCR Innovation, part of the U.N. refugee agency. Panels of lightweight plastic snap onto a metal frame held together by wires.
 
Full Story: NPR

emergentfutures:

New Kind Of Ikea Hack: Flat-Packs Head To Refugee Camps

Packaged inside iconic Ikea flat-packs come all the parts needed to put together a refugee housing unit, the result of more than two years of research by the Ikea Foundation, the Swedish retailer’s philanthropic arm, in partnership with UNHCR Innovation, part of the U.N. refugee agency. Panels of lightweight plastic snap onto a metal frame held together by wires.

 

Full Story: NPR

*99

(Source: cazalis, via thisbigcity)

condenasttraveler:

Follow CNTraveler on Pinterest for more travel inspiration.

condenasttraveler:

Follow CNTraveler on Pinterest for more travel inspiration.